Kat’s Taleathon wrap-up

Better late then never, am I right?

So, in the end I read six whole books, the first part of my Emily Dickinson poetry book and parts of a book I started before the taleathon began.

The books I read, were:

  • Hard-boiled Wonderland and the End of the World by Haruki Murakami (all of it)
  • The Ice Dragon by George R. R. Martin (all of it)
  • Exquisite Corpse by Poppy Z. Brite (all of it)
  • Rat Queens: Sass and Sorcery by Kurtis J. Wiebe (all of it)
  •  The Poetry of Emily Dickinson (the first part of it, about 70 pages worth of poems)
  • Ghostly Tales of Japan by Rafe Martin (all of it)
  • The Haunting of Gillespie House by Darcy Coates (all of it)
  • The Devil in Silver by Victor LaValle (parts of it)

As for the challenges, I finished them all .

Entirely optional challenges:

Read a graphic novel or comic (The first Saturday of May is “Free Comic Book Day“, so we encourage you to read one then!)
Read something translated
Read something by an author who is not European or from North America.
Read something by a LGBTQIA+ author
Read a different text type/format than you normally read (ie. if you read novels normally you might try a poem, short story, essay or non-fiction of some kind).

I also want to share a panel from Rat Queens, which really hit home with me.

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Kristine’s Taleathon wrap up

If you follow me on Instagram you will have seen what I’ve been reading, but I’m here to repeat myself.

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The first thing I did was finish Prudence by Gail Carriger, and I cannot decide how I feel about it, I had a lot of issues with this so this is definitely my least favourite Carriger book (I’ve read all but one of her others). Let’s skip to the comic that I read, Body Work, which is a story about Ben Aaronovitch’ Peter Grant. I really enjoyed it, it was a fun and fast read, the art was nice and it was fun seeing the characters I’ve read and imagined drawn and coloured, some look a lot like I pictured, others far from it.

Then I read Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own. This is an essay based on lectures so a genre/thing I don’t read often! I really like Woolf and the way she thinks so this was great to read (and honestly something I should have read a long time ago, I’ve read other essays by her though). Lastly I started (but did not finish, I’m about halfway through, loving it so far) What I Talk About When I Talk About Running by Haruki Murakami. Which is translated from the Japanese and by an author not from Europe/N.A. So I got 4/5 optional challenges.

All in all I’m really happy about the reading I got done, even if it didn’t all align with my plans I had a good weekend. It also got really warm here so I’ve been busy not melting, and having neighbouring cats come visit. I swear I’m about to start Neko Atsumeing in real life if they keep it up. Their mother is often gone anyway…

 

Taleathon 2016: 6-8 May!

Last year, the first weekend of May we ran our little readathon. It had a grand total of 2 participants (you guessed it, they were both us). There are no prizes, no competition, no rules, no requirements to participate outside “read something”. The idea is just to read more than you would normally, but we have a few challenges if you (like us) like to check things off a list to feel like your are making progress!

We want you to finish that book you’ve been reading forever, but keep putting down for other things, try a new genre or a new format, broaden your reading life a little bit, try a new author, and move outside your comfort zone a little bit!

Entirely optional challenges:

Read a graphic novel or comic (The first Saturday of May is “Free Comic Book Day“, so we encourage you to read one then!)
Read something translated
Read something by an author who is not European or from North America.
Read something by a LGBTQIA+ author
Read a different text type/format than you normally read (ie. if you read novels normally you might try a poem, short story, essay or non-fiction of some kind).

We want to challenge ourselves to read more, more stories, more diversely, more types of writing. If you want to count what you’re reading then we recommend counting works, so that a poem and a novel are equal and/or time spent, but really you can count however you want.

We will be present here on the blog and on our twitter account, where we will be using the hashtag #Taleathon because why not? Feel free to use it too and keep us from talking to ourselves all the time! Our twitter: https://twitter.com/cats_tale

We’re GMT +2 hours (Central European Summer Time be damned!) and will start reading at 12:00 (noon!) May 6, and end at 23:59 May 8, but you are welcome to start according to your timezone.

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Kristine’s Taleathon TBR

Okay, so I have a lot of books that should be on this TBR, but I decided to keep it simple, mostly due to the giant book in the pile:

I want to finish Max, Mischa & Tetoffensiven by Johan Harstad, I’m over the halfway point, but have 400 or so pages to go. Then I’ve got Prudence by Gail Carriger, which I’m also in the middle of. Then I’ve got Woolf’s A Room o One’s Own, because I should have read this years ago, and also in April. Rivers of London is the comic book verson of Ben Aaronovtich’s Peter Grant and I’m so exited. After that? I don’t know. These only tick a few boxes in the challenge and I do want to tick all of them, but I’ve got some other things in mind if I still have time or decide to take a break from one of these,

Taleathon 2016 – Kats TBR

So, I’ve made myself a little tbr for the upcoming readathon that we’re hosting, from the 6th to the 8th of May.

We have some challenges to try to read a bit more diversly than usual, which are entirly optinal and you can read more about them in the info post about the Taleathon. Read it here

This is the books I’m going to try and get through next weekend.

– Exquisite Corps by Poppy Z. Brite (A book by a LGBTQIA+ author)
– Rat Queens volume 1: Sass and Sorcwery by Kurtis J. Wiebe (Graphic novel)
– Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World by Haruki Murakami (Book by an author from that isn’t from Europe or North America and a translated book, which I will read in norwegian)
– Some poems from my book The Poetry of Emily Dickinson or Blood Sugar by Nicole Blackman (to read a format I don’t usually read)

What are you gonna read?

Happy reading
Kat